My Thoughts and Reflections on Everything

Basically just my take on life as I see it :)

Jongandhi in Istanbul, Turkey

I’ve already come to this stage in life where I just yearn for life’s simplest pleasures.

When I travel, I now tend to buy less things than I used to. Oh I’d still be buying books (comic graphic novels mostly) but I’d be more concern in taking in the sights, sampling some nice bites and beverages wherever I might be at that time.

Istanbul was one of the places I’ve visited and I enjoyed being there. Maybe someday I’ll post some pictures of my trip once I get the pics from my wife. Or maybe I’ll just cheat and present images from the Net. How else should I preserve my anonymity if I ever used actual pics?

Anyway, here are some samples of places that I’ve visited so far during my lifetime…

The Grand Bazaar (Turkish: Kapalıçarşı, meaning Covered Bazaar) in Istanbul is one of the largest and oldest covered markets in the world, with more than 58 covered streets and over 1,200 shops which attract between 250,000 and 400,000 visitors daily. Opened in 1461, it is well known for its jewelry, pottery, spice, and carpet shops. Many of the stalls in the bazaar are grouped by the type of goods, with special areas for leather coats, gold jewelry and the like. The bazaar contains two bedestens (domed masonry structures built for storage and safe keeping), the first of which was constructed between 1455 and 1461 by the order of Sultan Mehmed the Conqueror. The bazaar was vastly enlarged in the 16th century, during the reign of Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent, and in 1894 underwent a major restoration following an earthquake. (Taken from Wikipedia)

The Grand Bazaar (Turkish: Kapalıçarşı, meaning Covered Bazaar) in Istanbul is one of the largest and oldest covered markets in the world, with more than 58 covered streets and over 1,200 shops which attract between 250,000 and 400,000 visitors daily. Opened in 1461, it is well known for its jewelry, pottery, spice, and carpet shops. Many of the stalls in the bazaar are grouped by the type of goods, with special areas for leather coats, gold jewelry and the like. The bazaar contains two bedestens (domed masonry structures built for storage and safe keeping), the first of which was constructed between 1455 and 1461 by the order of Sultan Mehmed the Conqueror. The bazaar was vastly enlarged in the 16th century, during the reign of Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent, and in 1894 underwent a major restoration following an earthquake. (Taken from Wikipedia)

Yeah, this is one of the few places that we’ve visited during our trip. Amazingly solid for its age. Air circulation is very good and well thought about by its architects and builders. Though I didn’t care much about the vendors’ attitude; they don’t like you touching their items unless you have the intention of buying them. They can be quite rude.

The Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Turkish: Sultanahmet Camii) is the national mosque of Turkey, and is a historical mosque in Istanbul, the largest city in Turkey and the capital of the Ottoman Empire (from 1453 to 1923). The mosque is one of several mosques known as the Blue Mosque for the blue tiles adorning the walls of its interior. (Taken from Wikipedia)

The Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Turkish: Sultanahmet Camii) is the national mosque of Turkey, and is a historical mosque in Istanbul, the largest city in Turkey and the capital of the Ottoman Empire (from 1453 to 1923). The mosque is one of several mosques known as the Blue Mosque for the blue tiles adorning the walls of its interior. (Taken from Wikipedia)

Another place of wonder that we visited was the Blue Mosque of Istanbul. I’ve never stepped into a mosque before and my first time ever is in faraway Istanbul. I find it being very cosy inside, peaceful and a nice place to pray, meditate or reflect…

The structure is magnificent and I feel blessed having visited the place.

It was built between 1609 and 1616, during the rule of Ahmed I. Like many other mosques, it also comprises a tomb of the founder, a madrasah and a hospice. The Sultan Ahmed Mosque has become one of the most popular tourist attractions in Istanbul. (Taken from Wikipedia)

Sultan Ahmed Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey It was built between 1609 and 1616, during the rule of Ahmed I. Like many other mosques, it also comprises a tomb of the founder, a madrasah and a hospice. The Sultan Ahmed Mosque has become one of the most popular tourist attractions in Istanbul. (Taken from Wikipedia)

So far in all of my travels, I’ve found Istanbul to be most unique in the sense of being a truly modern Islamic state. The country is 98% Muslim and yet still open minded (i.e they don’t go around imposing Islam on others like some fanatical people…) about it. Another thing that I find interesting about the Turks is their immense patriotism towards their country. I mean they love themselves so much that you can tell on how they carry themselves. They reminded me some of the characters from a HBO mini series Rome. Robust in their ways and very friendly as well. They tend to speak out their minds.

Anyway, I gotta go. I’ll be posting more about Istanbul later.

Most probably I’ll be looking into the Ottoman Empire.

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